Intergenerational differences in workloads among primary care physicians: a ten-year, population-based study

Research

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Publication Topics

Intergenerational differences in workloads among primary care physicians: a ten-year, population-based study

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsWatson DE, Slade S, Buske L, Tepper J
JournalHealth affairs (Project Hope)Health.Aff.(Millwood)
Volume25
Issue6
Pages1620 - 1628
Date Published2006
KeywordsAdult, Age Distribution, Aged, Canada, Family Practice/manpower/organization & administration, Female, Forecasting, Health Services Accessibility/trends, Health Services Needs and Demand/trends, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Office Visits/utilization, Physicians, Women, Population Growth, Primary Health Care/manpower/organization & administration, Work Schedule Tolerance, Workload/statistics & numerical data
AbstractAnalyses of population-based services and surveys in Canada from the early 1990s and early 2000s indicate that younger and middle-aged family physicians carried smaller workloads in 2003 than their same-age peers did ten years earlier and that older family physicians carried larger workloads in 2003 than their same-age peers did ten years earlier. Yet family physicians in all age groups worked similar numbers of hours in 2003. Intergenerational effects are similar for male and female physicians, although feminization of the workforce will affect supply, as a result of the falling service volumes delivered by women.
Citation Key505