Error message

  • Strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in theme_biblio_tabular() (line 285 of /home/www/chspr/sites/all/modules/biblio/includes/
  • Strict warning: Only variables should be passed by reference in theme_biblio_tabular() (line 285 of /home/www/chspr/sites/all/modules/biblio/includes/

More Doctors or Better Care?


Related Publications

Smolina K, Weymann D, Morgan S, Ross C, Carleton B. Association between regulatory advisories and codeine prescribing to postpartum women. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2015;313(18):1861-2.
Suter E, Misfeldt R, Mallinson S, Wilhelm A, Boakye O, Marchildon G, et al. Comparative Review of the Policy Landscape of Team-based Primary Health Care Service Delivery in Western Canada. Alberta Health Services; 2014.
Laberge M, Pang J, Walker K, Wong ST, Hogg W, Wodchis WP. QUALICOPC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care) Canada: A focus on the aspects of primary care most highly rated by current patients of primary care practices. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement; 2014.
McGregor MJ, Abu-Laban RB, Ronald L, McGrail KM, Andrusiek D, Baumbusch J, et al. Nursing Home Characteristics Associated with Resident Transfers to Emergency Department. Canadian Journal on Aging. 2012;33(1):38-48.

Publication Topics

More Doctors or Better Care?

Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsMcGrail KM, Watson D
JournalHealthcare Policy
AbstractThe Canadian Medical Association's More Doctors, More Care campaign seeks to align physician supply targets with policy decisions elsewhere in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Using OECD data for 19 countries to assess the relationship between physician supply and healthcare outcomes, we have determined that there is no association between avoidable mortality and overall physician supply. Similarly, there is no relationship between avoidable mortality and general practitioners and family physicians per capita, specialists per capita, nurses per capita, doctors and nurses per capita or health expenditures per capita. These findings should move us to recognize that (a) more doctors will not necessarily translate into better healthcare outcomes for Canadians and (b) it is in Canadians' better interests that we instead focus on realizing opportunities to improve access to high-quality care and to ensure that changes in physician turnover do not threaten the current generalist-to-specialist mix.
Citation KeyCHSPR 09:11
Full Text