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Sleep problems and workplace injuries in Canada

Research

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Publication Topics

Sleep problems and workplace injuries in Canada

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsKling R, McLeod C, Koehoorn M
JournalSleep
Volume33
Start Page611
Issue5
Pages7
AbstractThis paper investigates the association between sleep problems and risk of work injuries among Canadian workers and to identify working groups most at risk for injuries. The study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 1.1 2000-2001. The study found that trouble sleeping was associated with an increased risk of work injury. The number of injuries attributable to sleep problems was higher for women compared to men. While most job classes and shift types showed an increased risk of injury, some groups such as women in processing and manufacturing and those who work rotating shifts warrant further investigation and attention for intervention.
URLhttp://www.journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=27783
Citation Key156
Full Text

This paper investigates the association between sleep problems and risk of work injuries among Canadian workers and to identify working groups most at risk for injuries. The study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Cycle 1.1 2000-2001. The study found that trouble sleeping was associated with an increased risk of work injury. The number of injuries attributable to sleep problems was higher for women compared to men. While most job classes and shift types showed an increased risk of injury, some groups such as women in processing and manufacturing and those who work rotating shifts warrant further investigation and attention for intervention.