Error message

Strict warning: Declaration of biblio_handler_citation::init() should be compatible with views_handler::init(&$view, &$options) in require_once() (line 2 of /home/www/chspr/sites/all/modules/biblio/views/biblio_handler_citation.inc).

Single and Group Practices Among Primary Health Care Physicians in British Columbia

Single and Group Practices Among Primary Health Care Physicians in British Columbia

UBC Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, Vancouver (BC) (2006)
Report
Abstract

etween 1997 and 2001, the Health Transition Fund financed pilot or evaluation projects across Canada; 65 of these projects focused on PHC. Four provinces (British Columbia, Ontario, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland) required physicians to work in groups and to move toward interdisciplinary teams as a precondition for funding.12 Toward the end of the Health Transition Fund era, it was evident that a national policy framework and additional investments were needed to kindle and sustain widespread momentum toward PHC renewal, including a transition to more group- and interdisciplinary- based practice. In September 2000, Canada’s First Ministers agreed upon an Action Plan for Health System Renewal
that included additional investments to catalyze PHC. The Government of Canada announced the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF) in 2001, which established a policy framework to guide the investment of $800 million to “support the transitional costs of implementing sustainable, large-scale, primary health care renewal initiatives.”13
Objectives of the PHCTF included the establishment of “in- terdisciplinary primary health care teams of providers, so that the most appropriate care is provided by the most appropriate provider” and collaborations among these teams to “facilitate co-ordination and integration with other health services, i.e., in institutions and in communities.” Subsequently, interdisci- plinary collaboration in PHC was explicitly mentioned in the First Ministers’ Accord14 and 10-Year Plan for Health Care in Canada (2004). All provincial governments now include this as one element of their goals and objectives statements for PHC renewal.15